The Volleyball Setter Position 

The volleyball setter runs the offense and her position is one of leadership and responsibility.


The setter leads their team's attack on their opponents, relays

tactical information from the coach to her teammates and is the

spark plug with the ability to see the big picture when it comes to

directing her team's offense.


When a team is on serve receive, the setter is responsible for running

the offense, which requires him or her to inform each of their

possible hitters what set they are going to give them.



Then they are required to try and touch every second ball in serve

receive and set it accurately to a spot on the net.  



Who is the volleyball setter and what're their responsibilities?



If you are the volleyball setter on your team, then you are in

charge of directing the play for the offensive attack.


You can be compared to a quarterback on a football team, or a point

guard on a basketball team. You, my friend are the shot caller.


As the setter, you will get feedback from your coach (or call

plays yourself) that you relay to your hitters about what sets you

will be giving them after your team has passed the ball to the

setter position at the net.


Yep, you get to call the plays your hitters run in the front row.

If you have backrow hitters you'll tell them what sets you'll be giving them

that they'll hit from the back row.


Like the quarterback, the setter is the playmaker on the court. 

Big baller, shot caller...whoops having too much fun..lets get back to

work. 


The setter indicates to each of their hitters, before the opposing team

serves the ball, what set she plans to deliver to each of them. 



Depending on what the coach has instructed the setter to do, sometimes

she will tell each hitter individually "Hey my outside hitter, for this play you

will hit the high ball outside", then she'll tell her middle "I'll be giving you a

one set in the middle and she'll tell her right side hitter " You need to hit a

red". 


Or a setter will make one call which represents one play. A play is the

hitting assignments all the hitters involved in the team offense

get from the setter during a rally.


All the hitters will hit a particular set, depending on which "play" the setter

calls, which is based on what plays they've trained on in practice. 


This takes a lot of practice.

Let's say in this case a setter calls the "Blue play" to her hitters, where she

utters one word "Blue" and all the players know what they are supposed

to hit based on that one word.


You know how they know?

Not by magic, but because they practiced the "Blue" play for hours in

training.

Just like they practiced the "green" play, the "yellow" play, the "orange"

play. 


Get it?




1120915SacVsPSU 062

photo by Luomen


Back to the Blue. Let's pretend. 


So for the "blue play" in this case, the outside hitter knows she hits a "shoot

set", the middle knows she'll need to hit the "back one" and one of the

back row hitters knows she hits a "pipe." 


There's no right side hitter because the setter is front row. So the setter will

call the "blue play" when she is front row. 


That's an offensive strategy, a "play" that a team runs where all

the players involved know what kind of set they will get from their

setter and know what they are expected to hit based on that

specific call.  

Blue!


See the difference? 



So to break it down...

If you are the setter, you have two ways you can call your offense.


You can tell your hitters individually what each of them are going to hit or

you can call a "play" and all hitters involved would know what they are

going to hit because this was what your team trained on for hours in

practice.  




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